ACPP in the News

Affordable, accessible health care is needed

Tuscaloosa News article

On the heels of President Barack Obama's health-care reenergizing speech last week, more information about health care was released. Alabama Arise said that more than 550,000 Alabamians or nearly 12 percent of the state's 4.6 million people did not have health insurance as of a year ago.

Read full article.

Debate targets major insurer

(Florence) Times-Daily article

Most Alabamians knew the company President Barack Obama was referring to Wednesday night when he singled out Alabama as the state with the greatest monopoly by one health insurance provider.

Read full article.

State expands ALL Kids program beginning Oct. 1

Birmingham News article

Alabama health officials expect to sign up thousands of more children for ALL Kids, the state's subsidized health insurance plan, when they roll out a major program expansion next month.

Read full article.

Willing to work

Anniston Star article

Tony Smith doesn't believe in the American dream anymore. The timeless national ethos, that in this country, one can start out poor and become rich through hard work, is widely revered. For generations, its presumed viability has offered hope to the disadvantaged and downtrodden, whether they grew up on the other side of the tracks or the other side of the world.

Read full article.

Food stamps hit record in Alabama

Gadsden Times article

As Labor Day approaches, fewer Alabamians have jobs, but a record number were on food stamps last month, more than at any time in state history, a reflection of a worsening economy and the 10 percent or higher state unemployment rate.

Read full article.

Birmingham ministers sign faith statement for health reform

Birmingham News article

Forty-one members of the Birmingham faith community signed a statement on health care change Tuesday at a rally in Grace Episcopal Church, Woodlawn. Faiths represented included Methodist, Presbyterian, Muslim, Primitive Baptist, Episcopal, Jewish, Unitarian Universalist and others.

Read full article.

Hunger pangs in Alabama

Anniston Star editorial

The reason most anti-poverty groups exist -- no, are needed -- is because too many Americans remain in poverty's throes. Too many go without adequate food, without heat in winter, without the basic necessities of life.

Read full editorial.

Businesses brace for impact of new federal minimum wage

Tuscaloosa News article

Rhett Madden works a double shift at Crimson Cafe, his business near the University of Alabama campus. He and his wife, Jessica, expect to put in even longer hours soon to help offset his second biggest expense -- payroll, which at the end of this week will get even bigger.

Read full article.

Some say program for poor has to expand

Anniston Star editorial

It's tough to be poor anywhere, but especially in Alabama. Our state has never been known for splurging on aid to the indigent.

Read full editorial.

At least it's a start

Anniston Star editorial

Alabama has the seventh highest rate of poverty in the nation, the 2001-02 Census says. Approximately 679,000 Alabama residents -- 15.2 percent of the state's population 11 live below the federal poverty line. So one would think any issue that affected so many Alabamians would be high on the state's legislative list of priorities.

Read full editorial.

Montgomery AL Non-Profit Website Design by BWS Internet Marketing Services