ACPP in the News

Insuring Alabama's story

Anniston Star editorial

Even when they mean well, opinion writers often deal with Alabama like an ex-girlfriend: They treat her poorly, say rude things when they shouldn't, and make a remorseful situation even worse.

For that, they should be ashamed. I am.

Read editorial here.

Invest in Alabama: Arise report spells out details

Anniston Star editorial

Love her as we do, for her beauty and her people, the state's status as one of America's perpetual economic strugglers is constantly reinforced. We wish that weren't the case, of course.

Last week, Arise Citizens' Policy Project threw more fuel on that fire with the release of The State of Working Alabama 2010, the annual examination of state employment produced by this worthwhile nonprofit that advocates for low-income residents.

Read editorial here.

More in Alabama in poverty, Census data shows

Birmingham News article

The economic downturn pushed more Alabamians into poverty and depressed household incomes overall, according to new 2009 census data released Tuesday.

"It's not good news," said Jim Carnes, spokesman for the anti-poverty advocacy group Alabama Arise in Montgomery. "We're seeing record numbers on food stamps and insurance programs, and there really is a direct correlation -- as the poverty rate increases, government services have a greater demand."

Read article here.

Equal pay commission sought again

Gadsden Times article

Arise Citizens' Policy Project and the Alabama chapter of American Association of University Women will try again for an Equal Pay Commission in the 2011 legislative session.

"This was a high vote-getter this year," Arise executive director Kimble Forrister said Tuesday. "I think it is a more critical issue in the economic downturn as a lot of people are relying on one income in the family now."

Read article here.

Billions in Katrina recovery money still unspent

Montgomery Advertiser article

Five years after Hurricane Katrina, Gulf Coast states still haven't spent billions in federal aid on housing and other recovery projects.

Housing advocates say the Gulf region has been slow to get programs going, leaving many low- and moderate-income families without enough resources to repair homes or find an affordable place to live.

Read article here.

Medicaid shortfall: $64 million gap in Alabama budget threatens services

Montgomery Advertiser article

Alabama is enjoying its lowest infant-mortality rate in state history and the state's top doctor said part of the reason is because of a program that is now faced with a $64 million hole in its budget for fiscal 2011.

Read article here.

Food stamp cuts won't occur until 2014

Gadsden Times article

The $26 billion medical and teacher bailout bill signed by President Barack Obama cuts $12 billion in future food stamp payments for Alabama and other states.

Read article here.

Deeper in debt

Times Daily editorial

The sweeping financial reform bill signed recently by President Obama did not include tighter regulations on the payday loan industry, which preys on the financially vulnerable.

Read editorial here.

Experts disagree on effect of unemployment benefits extension

Montgomery Advertiser article

If Congress had not voted to extend unemployment benefits, not only would there have been a huge impact on 37,000 unemployed Alabamians, the overall state economy could have been affected, according to one economist.

Read article here.

No cap on payday loans

(Florence) Times-Daily article

The sweeping oversight reform of the country's financial industry is missing a key component that could protect low-income consumers, said a policy analyst for Alabama Arise, an advocacy organization for the poor.

Read article here.

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