ACPP news releases

#IamMedicaid campaign seeks to show human faces of Alabama's Medicaid debate

Alabama’s looming Medicaid cuts would harm hundreds of thousands of people across the state – mostly children, seniors, and people with disabilities. The new #IamMedicaid campaign is a grassroots effort to remind lawmakers and the public of the real people with real lives affected by the state’s ongoing Medicaid funding debate. (Click here for a PDF version of this news release.)

“Alabama’s Medicaid debate is about more than numbers on a spreadsheet. It’s about people,” Alabama Arise state coordinator Kimble Forrister said. “Medicaid cuts would reduce health care access and make life harder for many of the most vulnerable Alabamians: children, seniors, and people with disabilities. Their voices must be heard in this debate, and we’re excited about this new effort to change the conversation around Medicaid.”

The 2017 General Fund budget leaves Medicaid $85 million short of the funding that the agency says is needed to avoid cuts to services like outpatient dialysis and adult eyeglasses. Without new revenue to maintain current service levels, Medicaid also will make deep cuts in its payments to doctors and other providers. Those cuts could result in the closures of many hospitals and clinics, reducing health care access for families across the state.

“Medicaid coverage is essential to protect the health and well-being of hundreds of thousands of children in Alabama,” Alabama Children First executive director Christy Cain said. “So many times, we get caught up in the numbers, and we forget those numbers represent real people with real lives and that they deal with real challenges.”

Details about the #IamMedicaid campaign, along with personal stories and pictures, are available at iammedicaid.com, as well as on the initiative’s Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Posted April 20, 2016.

Alabama Senate's vote a huge step for payday lending reform

ACPP executive director Kimble Forrister issued the following statement Tuesday, April 5, 2016, after the Alabama Senate voted 28-1 to pass SB 91, a payday lending reform bill sponsored by Sen. Arthur Orr, R-Decatur:

“The Senate’s vote for meaningful payday lending reform today was a big win for Alabama consumers. SB 91 would give payday borrowers a more realistic path out of debt by allowing them to make installment payments over time. The bill also would slash interest rates and place other overdue, common-sense limits on payday loans in Alabama.

“Today’s vote was a historic breakthrough for the growing bipartisan movement to rein in high-cost lending in our state. Now it’s the House’s turn to keep that momentum going and make life better for thousands of Alabama families.

Thanks to all the folks who contacted their senators, especially the dozens of advocates who went to the State House. Thanks to Sen. Arthur Orr, the bill sponsor, and to Sen. Linda Coleman-Madison for her help in the floor debate.”

Alabama children deserve better than these Medicaid cuts

ACPP executive director Kimble Forrister issued the following statement Tuesday, April 5, 2016, after the Alabama Legislature overrode the governor’s veto to pass a General Fund budget that would force deep Medicaid cuts:

“We can’t build a stronger Alabama by taking a sledgehammer to the foundation of our state’s health care system. But that’s just what this inadequate General Fund budget would do.

“This budget would force devastating Medicaid cuts that could force many hospitals to close and lead many pediatricians to leave the state. These cuts could put health care at risk for hundreds of thousands of our state’s most vulnerable residents: children, seniors, and people with disabilities. And new Medicaid reforms to save money and keep people healthier would grind to a halt.

“Alabama’s children deserve a better future than this. Our state needs new revenue to prevent these Medicaid cuts and continue building a stronger, healthier Alabama for all.”

Medicaid cuts would devastate Alabama's health care system

ACPP executive director Kimble Forrister issued the following statement Tuesday, March 15, 2016, after the Alabama House passed a General Fund budget that would force deep Medicaid cuts:

“These Medicaid cuts would be devastating for Alabamians, our economy and our entire health care system. They could force many rural hospitals to close and prompt many pediatricians to leave the state. They would end coverage of essential services like outpatient dialysis and adult eyeglasses. And they would end promising new Medicaid reforms that would save money and keep people healthier.

“We simply can’t afford these Medicaid cuts. It’s wrong to put health care at risk for children, seniors, and people with disabilities in Alabama. It’s time to get serious about raising the revenue needed to invest in a healthier Alabama for all.”

Medicaid is the foundation of Alabama’s health care system, and lawmakers should protect it

ACPP executive director Kimble Forrister issued the following statement Thursday, Feb. 25, 2016, after the Alabama Senate passed a General Fund budget that could force deep cuts to Medicaid:

“Medicaid is the foundation of Alabama’s entire health care system, and it’s essential to protect it. Our state has gotten federal approval for promising new Medicaid reforms to save money and keep Alabamians healthier. Now we need to invest in these reforms to make them work.

“Medicaid insures many of the most vulnerable Alabamians: children, seniors, and people with disabilities. As the budget debate goes forward, we hope lawmakers will be careful not to send patients a message that their basic health care could be at risk. Considering how important Medicaid is to the health of our neighbors and our economy, we need to approach this debate with the urgency and gravity it deserves.”

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