ACPP news releases

New Alabama Medicaid reform plan must include strong consumer engagement and oversight

Arise Citizens’ Policy Project policy director Jim Carnes issued the following statement Thursday, July 27, 2017, in response to Alabama Medicaid’s announcement that it will pursue an “alternative” to the regional care organization (RCO) reform plan:

“Alabama Medicaid’s decision to end its effort to develop homegrown managed care through regional care organizations is a disappointment but not a surprise. We’ve seen the Legislature’s support for the plan wane since it passed unanimously in 2013, as expectations for its budgetary impact shifted. Medicaid policy changes promised by Congress and the White House after the November election further clouded the prospects for RCO success.

“From the start, Arise has believed that strong consumer oversight is an essential component of Medicaid reform. That’s why we’ve worked hard with our partners at the Disabilities Leadership Coalition of Alabama to fulfill the consumer engagement role spelled out for us in the RCO law. We regret that this innovative, collaborative experiment has run aground, but we welcome the opportunity to apply those same consumer-focused principles in whatever alternative reforms Medicaid pursues.

“State ‘flexibility’ for Medicaid is a hot topic in Washington right now, and RCOs were a good example of state-based decision-making about health care delivery. But ‘flexibility’ cannot be a code word for undermining the basic promise of Medicaid by cutting essential benefits, shortchanging health care providers or taking away coverage from children, seniors, pregnant women, and people with disabilities across Alabama. Medicaid is the backbone of our state’s health care system, and we must keep it strong.”

ACA repeal plans would hurt everyday Alabamians

Arise Citizens’ Policy Project policy director Jim Carnes issued the following statement Tuesday, July 25, 2017, in response to the U.S. Senate vote to begin limited debate on repealing the Affordable Care Act:

“The Senate’s 51-50 vote to fast-track a health care plan before even deciding which plan to consider was beyond reckless, but this process is far from over. Senators should oppose any bill that would increase insurance costs for struggling families or send us back to the bad old days of limiting benefits and discriminating against people with pre-existing conditions. We especially urge lawmakers to reject cruel cuts to Medicaid, which provides essential health coverage for children, seniors, pregnant women, and people with disabilities across Alabama and across the country.

“Every health care plan that Congress has considered so far this year would send out-of-pocket costs soaring and would leave millions more Americans, including tens of thousands of Alabamians, without health coverage. If ‘higher costs and a higher uninsured rate’ is your answer on health care, you’re asking the wrong question.

“The Senate should take a deep breath and work together in an open, thoughtful, bipartisan way to preserve the Affordable Care Act’s consumer protections, reduce insurance costs and extend quality, affordable health care to all Americans.”

Now is the time to repair, not repeal, the Affordable Care Act

Arise Citizens’ Policy Project executive director Kimble Forrister issued the following statement Tuesday, July 18, 2017, in response to the collapse of U.S. Senate efforts to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act:

“The defeat of the Senate’s awful health care bill was a victory for Alabama families. This cruel plan would have gutted Medicaid, which provides essential health coverage for children, seniors, and people with disabilities in every corner of our state, to pay for huge tax cuts for rich people and big corporations. It would have hammered rural hospitals and nursing homes while sending insurance costs soaring for many older Alabamians. And it would have sent us back to the bad old days of limiting benefits and discriminating against folks with pre-existing conditions.

“Powerful advocacy from everyday people across Alabama and across the country stopped the bad Senate bill in its tracks. We urge senators to stop trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act and start trying to make it work better for everyone. Our lawmakers should work together in an open, thoughtful, bipartisan way to strengthen the ACA, reduce insurance costs and extend quality, affordable health care to all Americans.”

U.S. Senate health care bill would be bad for Alabama

Arise Citizens' Policy Project executive director Kimble Forrister issued the following statement Thursday, June 22, 2017, in response to the release of the U.S. Senate's proposed health care bill:

"The Senate bill would be devastating for children, seniors, working families, and people with disabilities across Alabama. This mean-spirited plan would slash Medicaid and force millions of low- and middle-income Americans to pay more for insurance that covers less.
 
"Rural communities, older people, and folks with pre-existing conditions would suffer under the Senate plan, all for the sake of a massive tax cut for big corporations and wealthy households. The Senate bill is bad for Alabama and bad for America, and it deserves a swift defeat."

U.S. Senate should protect Americans’ health care by rejecting House’s reckless 'repeal and replace' plan

Arise Citizens Policy Project policy director Jim Carnes issued the following statement Thursday, May 4, 2017, in response to the U.S. Houses passage of the American Health Care Act:

“Today’s narrow U.S. House vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act in exchange for a giant tax cut for the wealthiest Americans sends a harsh message to Alabamians, but it’s not the final word. Unless the Senate rejects it, this bill would force harmful cuts to Medicaid, which covers more than 1 million children, low-income seniors, pregnant women and people with disabilities across Alabama. For everyone else, the bill would turn back the clock to a time when insurers could discriminate against people who got sick and could deny coverage for life-saving treatments by imposing annual and lifetime benefit caps.

“The Affordable Care Act has helped millions of people and saved thousands of lives across Alabama. Nearly 200,000 Alabamians have signed up for insurance through the ACA. More than 2 million Alabamians have pre-existing conditions that would have made it hard or impossible for them to get full coverage before the ACA lifted coverage caps and guaranteed their access to insurance. And the ACA has significantly reduced the number of uninsured young Alabamians by allowing 35,000 of them to remain on their parents’ plans until age 26.

“Instead of improving the current law with sensible, targeted changes, the House has voted to reverse the ACA’s gains and put our nation’s health care in peril. Alabamians have spoken out loud and clear against the House vote. It’s time to turn our voices to the Senate, where we’re counting on our senators to stand up for a healthier Alabama and stop this reckless bill in its tracks.”

Montgomery AL Non-Profit Website Design by BWS Internet Marketing Services